Pete Bernardo / Design / April 1st, 2014

An Introduction to Responsive Web Design from America East 2014

This week, I’m representing 352 at America East Media Business and Technology Conference, a new expo focused on delivering digital options to the newspaper business, and I spoke today about the importance of Responsive Web Design.  Though responsive isn’t a word you’d typically associate with the print media, it’s a design model that can deliver a lot of value, especially to the news media. For decades, newspapers have been locked in terms of page size, headlines and paragraph limits, and while many papers have shifted to the web, they often don’t meet the needs of their users. Even larger news organizations, like NBC News, who have shifted to responsive web platforms really haven’t delivered a design that works for users.

As a company, we feel right at home working with newspapers, having created a fully responsive, interactive web experience for the Tampa Bay Times. So why is responsive so important? The rise of mobile and tablet traffic means that your users are all viewing your site on a different-sized screen. Sure, many might have an iPad, but plenty are viewing on their phone or desktop computer, and each of these devices have screens of different size. While you can obviously develop both a mobile and a desktop site, that still doesn’t necessarily account for a varying screen sizes or device type. Responsive web design, which I go through in more detail below, fixes that by ensuring your content fits the screen it’s being viewed on, no matter the size.

If you have any questions, reach out to me on Twitter at @petebernardo or stop by Booth 27 to chat about UX and responsive design.

  • Paul Traylor

    Your great slideshow says it all! Sorry I missed your talk 🙁

  • Paul Traylor

    Your great slideshow says it all! Sorry I missed your talk 🙁

  • http://352inc.com Lincoln Anderson

    Great overview, this is a topic that needs to be re-reviewed every few months, as things change so quickly. I’d love to see more “responsive design patterns”, with progressive content layouts. (Like on slide 19)