Brian Russell
Brian Russell / Digital Marketing / January 31st, 2014

Open Book Management for the Web

One of the biggest events of the year in the U.S. will happen this weekend, as if you need to be told.

One of the ways Zappos let their customer service team know the score each day, as photographed during a 2011 trip through their Henderson, NV offices.
One of the ways Zappos let their customer service team know the score each day, as photographed during a 2011 trip through their Henderson, NV offices.

Arguably the most important part of the entire game — debatable only because of the number of casual viewers watching the Super Bowl for the commercials and festivities — will be who won. Viewable by every player on the field, every seat in MetLife Stadium, and up on every TV set during the game will be the tally of who is winning and by how much, seen right up there on the scoreboard.

In business, we need more scoreboards.

I’m a fan of open book management, but I understand why some business owners and C-level executives may fear that level of transparency or feel it’s not beneficial to their business.

Whether you can or can’t open up your balance sheets for your entire team to see, there is one scoreboard I’d encourage you to open to your employees: your web stats.

I’ll assume your company’s website and any other web presence is important. Let everyone know its importance by sharing stats like transactions made, leads generated or site visits. Then, as the open book management theory goes, the staff will feel empowered to impact those numbers.

The same goes for any social media presence your company has. Whether you’re just showing bits like your count of fans or followers, video views or positive reviews submitted, you’re providing employees with valuable information.

Opening up web stats for others will also be an exercise in making sure employees know where the company is at online and the purposes of its web presence. Do all of the employees know what’s on the website right now that could benefit current or potential customers? Do they know what being published online by the team? Do they have the power to suggest what effort to tackle next online?

Sports fans have the advantage of always knowing the score of a game. But no matter what superstitious rituals they enact and no matter how loud they cheer, they won’t be able to impact the game. In business, each employee, I believe, can make a difference. Making sure everyone in the company can view the scoreboard is a starting place to allow them to make plays and help their team win.

Photo Credit: R.J. Malfalfa